Category : 습성

Éva Székely

The native form of this personal name is Székely Éva. This article uses Western name order when mentioning individuals.

Éva Székely

Éva Székely in 1956

Personal information

Born
(1927-04-03) 3 April 1927 (age 89)
Budapest, Hungary

Sport

Sport
Swimming

Club
Neményi MADISZ
BVSC, Budapest

Medal record

Representing  Hungary

Olympic Games

1952 Helsinki
200 m breaststroke

1956 Melbourne
200 m breaststroke

European Championships

1947 Monte Carlo
200 m breaststroke

Éva Székely (born 3 April 1927) is a Hungarian swimmer. She won the gold medal at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki and the silver medal at the 1956 Summer Olympics. She held the first world record in the 400 m individual medley in 1953.[1]
Earlier in 1941 Székely set a national speed record, although she was barely allowed to start because she was a Jew.[2] She was excluded from competition for the next four years, and survived the Holocaust partly because she was a famous swimmer.
Her daughter, Andrea Gyarmati was a backstroke and butterfly swimmer who won two medals at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. Her former husband Dezső Gyarmati is a multiple Olympic champion in water polo.[3]
After retiring from competitions Székely worked as a pharmacist and swimming coach, training her daughter among others. In 1976 she was inducted to the International Swimming Hall of Fame.[1] She wrote three books, one of which was translated to other languages.

Only winners are allowed to cry! (Sírni csak a győztesnek szabad!) Budapest, 1981, Magvető Kiadó
I came, I saw, I lost? (Jöttem, láttam… Vesztettem?) Budapest, 1986, Magvető Kiadó
I Swam It/I Survived (Megúsztam) Budapest, 1989, Sport Kiadó

References[edit]

^ a b EVA SZEKELY (HUN). ishof.org
^ Hall of fame – Székely Éva. sportmuzeum.hu
^ Éva Székely. sports-reference.com

See also[edit]

List of select Jewish swimmers

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Olympic champions in women’s 200 m breaststroke

1924:  Lucy Morton (GBR)
1928:  Hilde Schrader (GER)
1932:  Clare Dennis (AUS)
1936:  Hideko Maehata (JPN)
1948:  Nel van Vliet (NED)
1952:  Éva Székely (HUN)
1956:  Ursula Happe (EUA)
1960:  Anita Lonsbrough (GBR)
1964:  Galina Prozumenshchikova (URS)
1968:  Sharon Wichman (USA)
1972:  Beverley Whitfield (AUS)
1976:  Marina Kosheveya (URS)
1980:  Lina Kačiuš


Department of Canadian Heritage

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Canadian Heritage

Patrimoine canadien

Department overview

Formed
1993

Type
Department responsible for

Citizenship and Heritage
Cultural Affairs
International and Intergovernmental Affairs and Sport
Planning and Corporate Affairs
Public and Regional Affairs

Jurisdiction
Canada

Annual budget
CAD$ 3.3 billion (2015)[1]

Ministers responsible

Mélanie Joly
Carla Qualtrough
Maryam Monsef

Deputy Minister responsible

Graham Flack

Website
www.canadianheritage.gc.ca

Terrasses de la Chaudière, home of the head office of the Department of Canadian Heritage

The Department of Canadian Heritage, or simply Canadian Heritage (French: Patrimoine canadien), is the department of the Government of Canada with responsibility for policies and programs regarding the arts, culture, media, communications networks, official languages, status of women, sports, and multiculturalism.

Contents

1 Department
2 Officials and Structure
3 Funding
4 References
5 External links

Department[edit]
The Department oversees Royal visits of the Queen of Canada and members of the royal family to Canada. It was formerly a part of the Department of Communications, until that department’s technical side was merged into the Department of Industry in 1996, forming the Department of Canadian Heritage from its non-technical side. In late 2008, the multiculturalism component of this department was transferred to the Department of Citizenship and Immigration.
The department’s headquarters are in the Jules Léger Building (South) (Édifice Jules Léger (Sud)) in Terrasses de la Chaudière, Gatineau, Quebec,[2] across the Ottawa River from the Canadian capital of Ottawa.
Officials and Structure[edit]

Minister of Canadian Heritage

Hon. Mélanie Joly

Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

Hon. Carla Qualtrough

Minister of Status of Women

Hon. Maryam Monsef

Funding[edit]
Canadian Heritage funds the following:[3]

federally funded 150th anniversary of Canada activities[4]
Aboriginal Friendship Centres
Aboriginal Languages Initiative
Aboriginal Languages Initiative Innovation Fund
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Scholarship Program
Aboriginal Women’s Programming
Action Canada (program)|Act


Conservatism in Australia

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Conservatism

Variants

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People

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Eugeni d’Ors
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Plinio Corrêa de Olivei


Weightlifting at the 2010 Asian Games – Women’s 58 kg

Women’s 58 kg
at the 2010 Asian Games

Venue
Dongguan Gymnasium

Date
November 15, 2010 (2010-11-15)

Competitors
15 from 12 nations

Medalists

 
Li Xueying
  China

 
Pak Hyon-suk
  North Korea

 
Jong Chun-mi
  North Korea

← 2006
2014 →

Weightlifting at the
2010 Asian Games

Men
Women

56 kg

48 kg

62 kg

53 kg

69 kg

58 kg

77 kg

63 kg

85 kg

69 kg

94 kg

75 kg

105 kg

+75 kg

+105 kg

Main article: Weightlifting at the 2010 Asian Games
The women’s 58 kg event at the 2010 Asian Games took place on 15 November 2010 at Dongguan Gymnasium.

Contents

1 Schedule
2 Records
3 Results
4 References
5 External links

Schedule[edit]
All times are China Standard Time (UTC+08:00)

Date
Time
Event

Monday, 15 November 2010
14:30
Group B

19:00
Group A

Records[edit]
Prior to this competition, the existing world and Asian records were as follows.

World Record
Snatch
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
111 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Clean & Jerk
 Qiu Hongmei (CHN)
141 kg
Tai’an, China
23 April 2007

Total
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
251 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Asian Record
Snatch
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
111 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Clean & Jerk
 Qiu Hongmei (CHN)
141 kg
Tai’an, China
23 April 2007

Total
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
251 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Games Record
Snatch
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
111 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Clean & Jerk
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
140 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Total
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
251 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Results[edit]

Legend

NM — No mark

Rank
Athlete
Group
Body weight
Snatch (kg)
Clean & Jerk (kg)
Total

1
2
3
Result
1
2
3
Result

01 !
 Li Xueying (CHN)
A
57.37
100
105
107
105
128
133
135
133
238

02 !
 Pak Hyon-suk (PRK)
A
57.54
100
104
106
104
128
128
135
128
232

03 !
 Jong Chun-mi (PRK)
A
57.77
93
97
98
98
122
126
127
127
225

4
 Pimsiri Sirikaew (THA)
A
57.74
90
93
97
97
118
123
128
123
220

5
 Wandee Kameaim (THA)
A
57.54
93
97
97
93
120
120
120
120
213

6
 Hidilyn Diaz (PHI)
B
57.56
90
94
97
94
111
115
115
115
209

7
 Okta Dwi Pramita (INA)
B
57.34
88
91
91
88
112
118
121
118
206

8
 Raema Lisa Rumbewas (INA)
B
56.99
90
94
94
94
111
111
111
111
205

9
&#1


The Foreigner (newspaper)

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The Foreigner is a Norwegian online English-language newspaper, established in February 2009.
References[edit]

External links[edit]

The Foreigner website

This article about a Norwegian newspaper is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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