Category : 기르는법

Under the Same Skin

Under the Same Skin

Directed by
Daniel Tinayre

Written by
Silvina Bullrich
Guy des Cars

Starring
Mirtha Legrand

Cinematography
Alberto Etchebehere

Release date

19 September 1962 (1962-09-19)

Running time

125 minutes

Country
Argentina

Language
Spanish

Under the Same Skin (Spanish: Bajo un mismo rostro) is a 1962 Argentine drama film directed by Daniel Tinayre. It was entered into the 12th Berlin International Film Festival.[1]
Cast[edit]

Mirtha Legrand
Silvia Legrand
Jorge Mistral
Mecha Ortiz – Madre Superiora
Maurice Jouvet

References[edit]

^ “IMDB.com: Awards for Under the Same Skin”. imdb.com. Retrieved 2010-02-03. 

External links[edit]

Under the Same Skin at the Internet Movie Database

This article related to an Argentine film of the 1960s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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2003 European Cross Country Championships

2003 European Cross Country Championships

Organisers
EAA

Edition
10th

Date
14 December

Host city
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Races
4

Distances
10.095 km – Men
6.595 km – Women
6.595 km – Junior men
4.52 km – Junior women

← 2002 Medulin
2004 Heringsdorf →

The 10th European Cross Country Championships were held at Edinburgh in Scotland on 14 December 2003. Serhiy Lebid took his fourth title in the men’s competition and Paula Radcliffe her second title in the women’s race.

Contents

1 Results

1.1 Men individual 10.095km
1.2 Men teams
1.3 Women individual 6.595km
1.4 Women teams
1.5 Junior men individual 6.595km
1.6 Junior men teams
1.7 Junior women individual 4.52km
1.8 Junior women teams

2 References
3 External links

Results[edit]
[1]
Men individual 10.095km[edit]

Pos.
Runners
Time

01 !
Serhiy Lebid
30:47

02 !
Juan Carlos de la Ossa
31:08

03 !
Eduardo Henriques
31:15

4.
Tom van Hooste
31:18

5.
Yevhen Bozhko
31:19

6.
Fabián Roncero
31:23

7.
Mustapha Essaïd
31:26

8.
El Hassan Lahssini
31:29

9.
Umberto Pusterla
31:32

10.
Driss El Himer
31:34

11.
Günther Weidlinger
31:35

12.
Iván Hierro
31:35

Men teams[edit]

Pos.
Team
Points

01 !
 France
Mustapha Essaïd
Driss El Himer
Khalid Zoubaa
El Hassan Lahssini
47

02 !
 Spain
Juan Carlos de la Ossa
Fabián Roncero
Iván Hierro
Kamal Ziani
47

03 !
 Portugal
Eduardo Henriques
Fernando Silva
Ricardo Ribas
José Ramos
57

4.
 Italy
71

5.
 Belgium
96

6.
 Russia

7.
 United Kingdom

8.
 Sweden
132

Women individual 6.595km[edit]

Pos.
Runners
Time

01 !
Paula Radcliffe
22:04

02 !
Elvan Abeylegesse
22:13

03 !
Anikó Kálovics
22:26

4.
Sonia O’Sullivan
22:36

5.
Hayley Yelling
22:44

6.
Olivera Jevtić
22:45

7.
Justyna Bąk
22:47

8.
Liz Yelling
22:49

9.
Patrizia Tisi
22:50

10.
Galina Bogomolova
22:54

11.
Hayley Tullett
22:59

12.
Kathy Butler
23:00

Women teams[edit]

Pos.
Team
Points

01 !
 United Kingdom
Paula Radcliffe
Hayley Yelling
Liz Yelling
Hayley Tullett
25

02 !
 Ireland
Sonia O’Sullivan
Rosemary Ryan
Anne Keenan-Buckley
Catherina McKiernan
78

03 !
 Portugal
Analía Rosa
Helena Sampaio
Analídia Torre
Inês Monteiro
84

4.
 France
84

5.
 Russia
114

6.
 Belgium
116

7.
 Italy
126

8.
 Spain
130

Junior men individual 6.595km[edit]

Pos.
Runners
Time

01 !
Yevgeniy Rybak


London School of Economics Gaddafi links

The affair of the LSE Libya Links refers to the various connections that existed between the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and the Libyan government and its leader Muammar Gaddafi and his son Saif al-Islam Gaddafi. The NGO Gaddafi Foundation pledged to donate £1.5 million over five years to a research centre, LSE Global Governance, of which £300k were paid. In addition, LSE Enterprise established a contract worth £2.2 million to train Libyan officials. In 2008, the LSE granted a PhD degree[1] to Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, the son of the Libyan leader, for a dissertation. Currently, allegations circulate that Gaddafi’s thesis was ghost-written and/or plagiarised. In December 2010, Muammar Gaddafi addressed members of the School in a video link-up where he was addressed as “Brother Leader” and received an LSE cap previously given to Nelson Mandela.
In connection with the civil uprising in Libya in February and March 2011, the links between LSE and the Gaddafi regime, and the conduct of individual members of LSE’s staff, came increasingly to be questioned.[2] As a result of the revelations, the LSE’s Director, Sir Howard Davies, resigned on 3 March 2011, citing “errors of judgement”.[3] In a New York Times op-ed piece on 7 March 2011, Roger Cohen wrote, in reference to events that had transpired at the School, “It may be possible to sink to greater depths but right now I can’t think how. …The Arab Spring is also a Western Winter. …How did we back, use and encourage the brutality of Arab dictators over so many years? To what degree did that cynical encouragement of despots foster the very jihadist rage Western societies sought to curb?”[4]

Contents

1 LSE and the Monitor Group
2 LSE grants PhD degree to Saif Gaddafi
3 Gaddafi donates money to LSE’s North Africa Programme
4 LSE planned to train “Libya’s future elite”
5 Fred Halliday: “A Dissenting Note”
6 Human Rights Watch criticism
7 LSE, Libya and BP
8 Saif Gaddafi’s Ralph Miliband Lecture
9 LSE’s video link-up with Gaddafi
10 Saif Gaddafi’s “Rivers of Blood” speech
11 Director Howard Davies resigns
12 LSE reactions

12.1 Students
12.2 Faculty

13 Saif Gaddafi’s replies to LSE reactions
14 Lord Woolf Inquiry
15 Other universities with Libyan links
16 References
17 External links

LSE and the Monitor Group[edit]
Main article: Monitor Group

Muammar Gaddafi at the African Union meeting, February 2009.

The London School of Economics

In 2004 Libya’s government engage