Department of Canadian Heritage

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Canadian Heritage

Patrimoine canadien

Department overview

Formed
1993

Type
Department responsible for

Citizenship and Heritage
Cultural Affairs
International and Intergovernmental Affairs and Sport
Planning and Corporate Affairs
Public and Regional Affairs

Jurisdiction
Canada

Annual budget
CAD$ 3.3 billion (2015)[1]

Ministers responsible

Mélanie Joly
Carla Qualtrough
Maryam Monsef

Deputy Minister responsible

Graham Flack

Website
www.canadianheritage.gc.ca

Terrasses de la Chaudière, home of the head office of the Department of Canadian Heritage

The Department of Canadian Heritage, or simply Canadian Heritage (French: Patrimoine canadien), is the department of the Government of Canada with responsibility for policies and programs regarding the arts, culture, media, communications networks, official languages, status of women, sports, and multiculturalism.

Contents

1 Department
2 Officials and Structure
3 Funding
4 References
5 External links

Department[edit]
The Department oversees Royal visits of the Queen of Canada and members of the royal family to Canada. It was formerly a part of the Department of Communications, until that department’s technical side was merged into the Department of Industry in 1996, forming the Department of Canadian Heritage from its non-technical side. In late 2008, the multiculturalism component of this department was transferred to the Department of Citizenship and Immigration.
The department’s headquarters are in the Jules Léger Building (South) (Édifice Jules Léger (Sud)) in Terrasses de la Chaudière, Gatineau, Quebec,[2] across the Ottawa River from the Canadian capital of Ottawa.
Officials and Structure[edit]

Minister of Canadian Heritage

Hon. Mélanie Joly

Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

Hon. Carla Qualtrough

Minister of Status of Women

Hon. Maryam Monsef

Funding[edit]
Canadian Heritage funds the following:[3]

federally funded 150th anniversary of Canada activities[4]
Aboriginal Friendship Centres
Aboriginal Languages Initiative
Aboriginal Languages Initiative Innovation Fund
Aboriginal Post-Secondary Scholarship Program
Aboriginal Women’s Programming
Action Canada (program)|Act


Vincent Bochdalek

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Vincent Bochdalek

Vincent Bochdalek

Born
1801
Litoměřice

Died
February 3, 1883

Nationality
Czech

Fields
anatomy

Influenced
Victor Bochdalek

Vincent Alexander Bochdalek (1801 – February 3, 1883) was a Bohemian anatomist. His first name has also been given as Vincenc and Vincenz.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Associated eponyms
3 References
4 Bibliography
5 External links

Biography[edit]
Bochdalek was born in Litoměřice. He obtained his doctorate in 1833 in Prague, where he was later professor of anatomy for several decades. He retired in 1874, settling in Litoměřice and later dying in Prague. His son, Victor Bochdalek (1835–1868), became a prominent physician in his own right.
Associated eponyms[edit]

Bochdalek’s cyst: a congenital cyst at the root of the tongue.
Bochdalek’s flower basket: part of the choroid plexus of the fourth ventricle protruding through the lateral bursa (recessus lateralis) of the fourth ventricle (Luschka’s foramen).
Bochdalek’s foramen: a congenital defective opening through the diaphragm, connecting pleural and peritoneal cavities.
Bochdalek’s ganglion: a ganglion of dental nerve in the jaw (maxilla) above the root of the canine teeth.
Bochdalek’s hernia: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia which allows protrusion of abdominal viscera into the chest.
Bochdalek’s triangle: the lumbocostal triangle, a triangle-shaped slit in the muscle plate between lumbar or sternal part in the diaphragm and the 12th rib.
Bochdalek’s valve: a fold of membrane in the lacrimal duct near the punctum lacrimale. Another name for this structure is Foltz’ valvule; named after French ophthalmologist Jean Charles Eugène Foltz (1822–1876).
Vater’s duct: a duct that in the embryo connects the thyroid diverticulum and the posterior part of the tongue.

References[edit]

MATOUSEK, O (March 1952). “Vincenc Alex. Bochdalek, first professor of pathological anatomy in Prague.”. Cas. Lek. Cesk. 91 (13): 407. ISSN 0008-7335. PMID 14390182. 
Wondrák, E (October 1983). “The Czech anatomist and pathologist V.A. Bochdalek–100 years since his death”. Cas. Lek. Cesk. CZECHOSLOVAKIA. 122 (43): 1334–7. ISSN 0008-7335. PMID 63574


Torn to Pieces

“Torn to Pieces”

Single by Pop Evil

from the album Onyx

Released
7 March 2014 (2014-03-07)

Format
Digital download

Genre
Post-grunge

Length
3:16

Label
eOne Music

Writer(s)
Dave Bassett, Leigh Kakaty

Producer(s)
Johnny K

Pop Evil singles chronology

“Deal with the Devil”
(2013)
“Torn to Pieces”
(2014)

“Torn to Pieces” is the third single by American rock band Pop Evil from Onyx, the third studio album from the ensemble.

Contents

1 Background
2 Critical reception
3 Music video
4 Chart performance
5 References

Background[edit]
The tune deals with the loss of lead vocalist Leigh Kakaty’s father.[1] Per a social media initiative started by the band, fans were asked to submit photos representing what the tune meant to them.[2] Regarding the song, lead vocalist Leigh Kakaty states “There’s nothing more haunting & torturous to the human soul than the feeling of losing someone close to you without saying goodbye”.[3]
Critical reception[edit]
The Chattanooga Pulse states that the song is “destined for the type of hardwon ubiquity earned by “Last Man Standing,” “Monster You Made” and the Mick Mars collaboration “Boss’s Daughter””[4] while Alessandra Donnelly of EOne Entertainment describes the tune as “a slow, brokenhearted ballad with a simple, catchy melody that flows into an emotional solo”.[5] The Valley Beat goes on to say that “though they resemble the likes of one of their previous ballads, “Monster You Made”, they still have enough balls to fit right in on this record”.[6]
Music video[edit]
The video was directed by Swedish director Johan Carlen.
Chart performance[edit]
In a matter of just over a month, the song went from being No. 1 most added to No. 13 on Active Rock.[7][clarification needed]

Chart (2014)
Peak
position

US Hot Rock Songs (Billboard)[8]
23

US Mainstream Rock (Billboard)[9]
1

References[edit]

^ “Pop Evil – Onyx Review”. Heavymetal.about.com. 2013-05-14. Retrieved 2014-04-09. 
^ “Pop Evil shoot new video for “Torn to Pieces” – Metal Riot”. Metalriot.com. 2014-03-08. Retrieved 2014-04-09. 
^ bravewords.com. “> News > POP EVIL Shoot ‘Torn To Pieces’ Video”. Bravewords.com. Retrieved 2014-04-09. 
^ “Pop Evil – The Pulse » Chattanooga’s Weekly Alternative”. Chattanoogapulse.com. 2014-01-02. Retrieved 2014-04-09. 
^ “Pop Evil: Onyx | The Aquarian Weekly”. Theaquarian.com. 2013-05-15. Retrieved 2014-04-09. 
^ “Pop Evil –


West Bengal State Council of Technical Education

West Bengal Council Of Technical Education

Abbreviation
WBSCTE

Formation
12 June 1996

Legal status
Statutory Body

Headquarters
Kolkata

Location

West Bengal

Main organ

State-level Council

Affiliations
Department of Higher Education (India), Ministry of Human Resource Development

Website
Official Website

Remarks
Sri Ujjal Biswas, Chairman

The West Bengal State Council of Technical Education (WBSCTE) is the statutory body and a state-level council for technical education, under Department of Technical Education & Training (West Bengal), Ministry of Technical Education& training.
Apart from the 86 Polytechnics in the state of West Bengal, India, Polytechnic Institute at Narsingarh in the state of Tripura, India is also affiliated to the West Bengal State Council of Technical Education. The Council has also been entrusted with the responsibilities for conduct of Short Term Vocational Training Programme in different centres and affiliate institutes offering Vocational Courses under the supervision of West Bengal State Council of Vocational Education and Training. The Polytechnics offers 3 year Diploma courses in Engineering/Technology (Pharmacy – 2 year and Marine Engineering – 4 year) along with 1½ year Post Diploma Courses and 4 year Part-time Evening Diploma Courses. Admission to all Polytechnics is conducted through the Joint Entrance Exam.
History[edit]
AICTE had started as an Advisory Body of the Ministry of Education, Government of India. By an Act of Parliament, AICTE was made a Statutory Body in 1987. The Statutory Council advised all States to give autonomous status to the State Councils of Technical Education. On the basis of aforesaid guideline, Government set up a committee under the Chairmanship of Prof. Sankar Sen, the then Vice Chancellor of Jadavpur University to suggest procedure for setting up a Statutory Council for the Technical Education. After examining the recommendations, Government in the Technical Education & Training Department moved a Bill before the Legislative Assembly for setting up a Statutory Council of Technical Education. West Bengal State Council of Technical Education became a Statutory Body under West Bengal Act XXI of 1995. The Council started its activities as a Statutory Body after Gazette Notification on 12 June 1996.
Composition of the Council[edit]
The Council is headed by Minister-in-Charge, Technical Education & Training Department as Ex Officio Chairman. Other members


Conservatism in Australia

Part of a series on

Conservatism

Variants

Cultural
Fiscal
Green
Liberal
Libertarian
National
Neo-
New Right
One-nation
Paleo-
Social
Traditionalist

Concepts

Conformity
Familism
Free markets
Limited government
Social norms
Patriotism
Private property
Protectionism
Rule of law
Tradition

People

Edmund Burke
Giambattista Vico
Justus Möser
Joseph de Maistre
Louis de Bonald
Adam Müller
Friedrich von Gentz
Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel
Novalis
Karl Ludwig von Haller
Pope Pius X
Pope Pius IX
Lucas Alamán
François de Chateaubriand
Antoine de Rivarol
Klemens von Metternich
Leopold von Ranke
Nikolay Karamzin
John A. Macdonald
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Juan Donoso Cortés
Jaime Balmes
Friedrich Julius Stahl
Aleksey Khomyakov
Ivan Kireyevsky
John C. Calhoun
Pyotr Stolypin
Miguel Miramón
Benjamin Disraeli
Otto von Bismarck
Ernst Ludwig von Gerlach
Friedrich Carl von Savigny
Frederick William IV of Prussia
Hippolyte Taine
Francisco Rolão Preto
Alexis de Tocqueville
Orestes Brownson
Louis Veuillot
Marcel Lefebvre
Ivan Aksakov
Frédéric le Play
Joseph Alexander von Hübner
François-René de La Tour du Pin
Tirso de Olazábal y Lardizábal
Juan Vázquez de Mella
Ramón Nocedal Romea
Félix Sardà y Salvany
Heinrich Leo
Konstantin Leontiev
Nikolay Danilevsky
Mikhail Katkov
Maurice Barrès
Robert Frost
Marcelino Menéndez y Pelayo
William Hurrell Mallock
John Henry Newman
Guillaume Groen van Prinsterer
Antoine Blanc de Saint-Bonnet
Alexander III of Russia
Konstantin Pobedonostsev
John of Kronstadt
Lev Tikhomirov
Vladimir Purishkevich
George Santayana
Gertrude Himmelfarb
Othmar Spann
Charles Maurras
Jacques Bainville
Léon Daudet
Ivan Ilyin
Edgar Julius Jung
Oswald Spengler
Anthony Ludovici
Arthur Moeller van den Bruck
Jules Barbey d’Aurevilly
Léon Bloy
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Ernst Jünger
Winston Churchill
Carl Friedrich Goerdeler
Henri Massis
Robert A. Taft
Enoch Powell
William F. Buckley Jr.
Ronald Reagan
Samuel P. Huntington
Margaret Thatcher
Carl Schmitt
Ramiro de Maeztu
Eugenio Vegas Latapie
José Calvo Sotelo
T. E. Hulme
T. S. Eliot
Pope Benedict XVI
Víctor Pradera Larumbe
Salvador Abascal
Eric Voegelin
Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn
Michael Oakeshott
Antonin Scalia
G. K. Chesterton
Hilaire Belloc
Robert Bork
C. S. Lewis
Francisco Elías de Tejada y Spínola
Richard M. Weaver
Leo Strauss
Robert P. George
Tony Abbott
John Howard
Peter Viereck
Russell Kirk
Thomas Molnar
Christopher Dawson
Eugeni d’Ors
Álvaro d’Ors
Plinio Corrêa de Olivei


1952 Chicago White Sox season

1952 Chicago White Sox

Major League affiliations

American League (since 1901)

Location

Comiskey Park (since 1910)

Chicago (since 1900)

Other information

Owner(s)
Grace Comiskey

General manager(s)
Frank Lane

Manager(s)
Paul Richards

Local television
WGN-TV
(Jack Brickhouse, Harry Creighton)

Local radio
WCFL
(Bob Elson, Dick Bingham)

 < Previous season     Next season  >

The 1952 Chicago White Sox season was the team’s 52nd season in the major leagues, and its 53rd season overall. They finished with a record 81–73, good enough for third place in the American League, 14 games behind the 1st place New York Yankees.

Contents

1 Offseason
2 Regular season

2.1 Season standings
2.2 Record vs. opponents
2.3 Opening Day lineup
2.4 Notable transactions
2.5 Roster

3 Player stats

3.1 Batting
3.2 Pitching

4 Farm system
5 Notes
6 References

Offseason[edit]

October 10, 1951: Marv Rotblatt, Jerry Dahlke, Bill Fischer, and Dick Duffy (minors) were traded by the White Sox to the Seattle Rainiers for Marv Grissom and Hal Brown.[1]
November 27, 1951: Joe DeMaestri, Gordon Goldsberry, Dick Littlefield, Gus Niarhos, and Jim Rivera were traded by the White Sox to the St. Louis Browns for Al Widmar, Sherm Lollar, and Tom Upton.[2]

Regular season[edit]
Season standings[edit]

American League
W
L
Pct.
GB

New York Yankees
95
59
.617

Cleveland Indians
93
61
.604
2

Chicago White Sox
81
73
.526
14

Philadelphia Athletics
79
75
.513
16

Washington Senators
78
76
.506
17

Boston Red Sox
76
78
.494
19

St. Louis Browns
64
90
.416
31

Detroit Tigers
50
104
.325
45

Record vs. opponents[edit]

1952 American League Records

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Sources:
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]

Team
BOS
CWS
CLE
DET
NYY
PHI
STL
WSH

Boston

12–10
9–13
16–6
8–14
12–10
11–11
8–14

Chicago
10–12

8–14–1
17–5
8–14
11–11
14–8
13–9–1

Cleveland
13–9
14–8–1

16–6
10–12
13–9
15–7
12–10

Detroit
6–16
5–17
6–16

9–13
5–17–1
8–14
11–11–1

New York
14–8
14–8
12–10
13–9

13–9
14–8
15–7

Philadelphia
10–12
11–11
9–13
17–5–1
9–13

14–8
9–13

St. Louis
11–11
8–14
7–15
14–8
8–14
8–14

8–14–1

Washington
14–8
9–13–1
10–12
11–11–1
7–15
13–9
14–8–1

Opening Day lineup[edit]

Chico Carrasquel, ss
Nellie Fox, 2b
Minnie Miñoso, lf
Eddie Robinson, 1b
Ray


Weightlifting at the 2010 Asian Games – Women’s 58 kg

Women’s 58 kg
at the 2010 Asian Games

Venue
Dongguan Gymnasium

Date
November 15, 2010 (2010-11-15)

Competitors
15 from 12 nations

Medalists

 
Li Xueying
  China

 
Pak Hyon-suk
  North Korea

 
Jong Chun-mi
  North Korea

← 2006
2014 →

Weightlifting at the
2010 Asian Games

Men
Women

56 kg

48 kg

62 kg

53 kg

69 kg

58 kg

77 kg

63 kg

85 kg

69 kg

94 kg

75 kg

105 kg

+75 kg

+105 kg

Main article: Weightlifting at the 2010 Asian Games
The women’s 58 kg event at the 2010 Asian Games took place on 15 November 2010 at Dongguan Gymnasium.

Contents

1 Schedule
2 Records
3 Results
4 References
5 External links

Schedule[edit]
All times are China Standard Time (UTC+08:00)

Date
Time
Event

Monday, 15 November 2010
14:30
Group B

19:00
Group A

Records[edit]
Prior to this competition, the existing world and Asian records were as follows.

World Record
Snatch
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
111 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Clean & Jerk
 Qiu Hongmei (CHN)
141 kg
Tai’an, China
23 April 2007

Total
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
251 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Asian Record
Snatch
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
111 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Clean & Jerk
 Qiu Hongmei (CHN)
141 kg
Tai’an, China
23 April 2007

Total
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
251 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Games Record
Snatch
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
111 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Clean & Jerk
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
140 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Total
 Chen Yanqing (CHN)
251 kg
Doha, Qatar
3 December 2006

Results[edit]

Legend

NM — No mark

Rank
Athlete
Group
Body weight
Snatch (kg)
Clean & Jerk (kg)
Total

1
2
3
Result
1
2
3
Result

01 !
 Li Xueying (CHN)
A
57.37
100
105
107
105
128
133
135
133
238

02 !
 Pak Hyon-suk (PRK)
A
57.54
100
104
106
104
128
128
135
128
232

03 !
 Jong Chun-mi (PRK)
A
57.77
93
97
98
98
122
126
127
127
225

4
 Pimsiri Sirikaew (THA)
A
57.74
90
93
97
97
118
123
128
123
220

5
 Wandee Kameaim (THA)
A
57.54
93
97
97
93
120
120
120
120
213

6
 Hidilyn Diaz (PHI)
B
57.56
90
94
97
94
111
115
115
115
209

7
 Okta Dwi Pramita (INA)
B
57.34
88
91
91
88
112
118
121
118
206

8
 Raema Lisa Rumbewas (INA)
B
56.99
90
94
94
94
111
111
111
111
205

9
&#1


Frog Redus

Frog Redus

Infielder

Born: (1905-01-03)January 3, 1905
Tullahassee, Oklahoma

Died: March 23, 1979(1979-03-23) (aged 74)
Tulsa, Oklahoma

Batted: Right
Threw: Right

Negro league baseball debut

1924, for the Cleveland Browns

Last appearance

1940, for the Chicago American Giants

Teams

Cleveland Browns (1924)[1]
Indianapolis ABCs (1924)
St. Louis Stars (1924–1931)
Kansas City Monarchs (1930)
Cleveland Stars (1932)
Columbus Blue Birds (1933)
Cleveland Giants (1933)
Cleveland Red Sox (1934)
Chicago American Giants (1934–1940)

Wilson Robert “Frog” Redus (January 29, 1905 – March 23, 1979) was an American baseball infielder in the Negro Leagues. He played from 1924 to 1940 with several teams, including the St. Louis Stars and the Chicago American Giants.[2]
References[edit]

^ “Prime Sports News” The Gazette, Cleveland, Ohio, Saturday, July 24, 1934, Page 2, Columns 3 and 4
^ Riley, James A. (1994). The Biographical Encyclopedia of the Negro Baseball Leagues. New York: Carroll & Graf. ISBN 0-7867-0959-6. 

External links[edit]

Negro league baseball statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference (Negro leagues)

This biographical article relating to an American baseball infielder is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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2003 European Cross Country Championships

2003 European Cross Country Championships

Organisers
EAA

Edition
10th

Date
14 December

Host city
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Races
4

Distances
10.095 km – Men
6.595 km – Women
6.595 km – Junior men
4.52 km – Junior women

← 2002 Medulin
2004 Heringsdorf →

The 10th European Cross Country Championships were held at Edinburgh in Scotland on 14 December 2003. Serhiy Lebid took his fourth title in the men’s competition and Paula Radcliffe her second title in the women’s race.

Contents

1 Results

1.1 Men individual 10.095km
1.2 Men teams
1.3 Women individual 6.595km
1.4 Women teams
1.5 Junior men individual 6.595km
1.6 Junior men teams
1.7 Junior women individual 4.52km
1.8 Junior women teams

2 References
3 External links

Results[edit]
[1]
Men individual 10.095km[edit]

Pos.
Runners
Time

01 !
Serhiy Lebid
30:47

02 !
Juan Carlos de la Ossa
31:08

03 !
Eduardo Henriques
31:15

4.
Tom van Hooste
31:18

5.
Yevhen Bozhko
31:19

6.
Fabián Roncero
31:23

7.
Mustapha Essaïd
31:26

8.
El Hassan Lahssini
31:29

9.
Umberto Pusterla
31:32

10.
Driss El Himer
31:34

11.
Günther Weidlinger
31:35

12.
Iván Hierro
31:35

Men teams[edit]

Pos.
Team
Points

01 !
 France
Mustapha Essaïd
Driss El Himer
Khalid Zoubaa
El Hassan Lahssini
47

02 !
 Spain
Juan Carlos de la Ossa
Fabián Roncero
Iván Hierro
Kamal Ziani
47

03 !
 Portugal
Eduardo Henriques
Fernando Silva
Ricardo Ribas
José Ramos
57

4.
 Italy
71

5.
 Belgium
96

6.
 Russia

7.
 United Kingdom

8.
 Sweden
132

Women individual 6.595km[edit]

Pos.
Runners
Time

01 !
Paula Radcliffe
22:04

02 !
Elvan Abeylegesse
22:13

03 !
Anikó Kálovics
22:26

4.
Sonia O’Sullivan
22:36

5.
Hayley Yelling
22:44

6.
Olivera Jevtić
22:45

7.
Justyna Bąk
22:47

8.
Liz Yelling
22:49

9.
Patrizia Tisi
22:50

10.
Galina Bogomolova
22:54

11.
Hayley Tullett
22:59

12.
Kathy Butler
23:00

Women teams[edit]

Pos.
Team
Points

01 !
 United Kingdom
Paula Radcliffe
Hayley Yelling
Liz Yelling
Hayley Tullett
25

02 !
 Ireland
Sonia O’Sullivan
Rosemary Ryan
Anne Keenan-Buckley
Catherina McKiernan
78

03 !
 Portugal
Analía Rosa
Helena Sampaio
Analídia Torre
Inês Monteiro
84

4.
 France
84

5.
 Russia
114

6.
 Belgium
116

7.
 Italy
126

8.
 Spain
130

Junior men individual 6.595km[edit]

Pos.
Runners
Time

01 !
Yevgeniy Rybak


Manorial waste

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Manorial waste refers to manorial land under English land law which was neither let to tenants nor did it form part of Demesne lands. Typically, this included hedges, verges, etc.

This article relating to law in the United Kingdom, or its constituent jurisdictions, is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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